Posts tagged "Estate Tax"

What to know about federal estate tax laws

Those living in North Carolina or any other state have the right to gift up to $11.18 million without any estate tax implication. The exemption amount was increased from around $5 million as per the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA). However, the exemption is planned to return to the old limit when 2025 comes to an end. Therefore, it is important to consider how to take advantage of the new rule while anticipating a potential clawback in 2026.

Tips for reducing estate tax

Some North Carolina residents may need to employ some strategies to reduce what their estate will owe in taxes. The current federal exemption is nearly $11.2 million, but for estates worth more than that, there are additional options.

Tax code changes impact life insurance trusts

There are an estimated 1,800 estates that will be subject to federal estate taxes after the passage of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act. The legislation increased the federal estate tax exemption to $11.2 million and $22.4 million for married couples. North Carolina residents could benefit from reviewing their estate plan in the aftermath of such a change to the tax code. It may be especially beneficial for those who have irrevocable life insurance trusts (ILITs).

Changes in the tax law and its effect on legacy planning

In 2017, Congress passed legislation that made significant changes to tax law. For people in North Carolina who are creating an estate plan, the major part of that law that may be of interest is the increase in the estate and gift tax exemption to $11.2 million for individuals and $22.4 million for couples. However, this is set to expire at the end of 2025. Furthermore, while planning to save on taxes is a part of legacy planning, it should not be the first priority.

What to know about estate taxes in 2018

In 2018, residents of North Carolina, along with the rest of the country, will have a $5.6 million federal estate tax exemption. This is an increase from $5.49 million in 2017. Couples may choose to combine their individual exemptions, which means that they have a total exemption of $11.2 million. However, couples will need to tell the IRS that this is what they want to do.

Estate tax rules withdrawn by the Treasury Department

Small business owners in North Carolina may breathe a sigh of relief upon learning that the proposed valuation rules for family businesses will be withdrawn by the Treasury Department. The rules were proposed in August 2016 and would have greatly limited discounts in value that business owners claim in order to pass their businesses on while minimizing their estate and gift taxes.

Estate tax and gift tax exemptions may rise in 2018

Couples in North Carolina and throughout America may see their joint federal estate tax exemption climb above $11 million in 2018. It is also likely that the gift tax exemption will increase to $15,000 for 2018, which would mark the first increase since 2013. The federal estate tax exemption is indexed to inflation, and was first set at $5 million in 2011.

IRS offers extensions to declare portability

Portability is an estate tax provision that allows married couples to combine their estate tax exemption. That exemption is currently close to $11 million between both spouses, but many executors in North Carolina may not understand that it isn't given automatically. To take advantage of the portability provision, a surviving spouse must tell the IRS that it is being used before they pass away.

Estate tax planning when one spouse is not a citizen

Estate planning in order to avoid or reduce estate tax can be complicated, and it may become even more complicated if one spouse is not a citizen. The U.S. has a tax treaty with more than 70 countries, but not all of these treaties deal with estate tax. One of the first steps for determining estate tax when one spouse is a foreign national is to establish whether or not a person is considered a resident. This determination can be somewhat subjective although if people appear to have a residence in North Carolina with no intention of leaving they may be considered resident for estate tax purposes.

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